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Social Media Inside, Outside Of The Classroom

Social Media Inside, Outside Of The Classroom

SmartBlogs - Sharon Davison

Thinking about social media and how it works in regards to learning inside and outside of classrooms is endless and inspiring. Just by tweeting an idea, you can spark a connection and invite your students to experience the value of social media.

As I began to dabble with this idea, I was immediately struck by how other educators were using this tool as a way to connect, engage and enhance learning. Read More


Why Don't Most People Stop Online Bullies?

Why Don't Most People Stop Online Bullies?

TechCrunch - John Biggs

In 1964 a woman named Kitty Genovese was stabbed and left for dead in Kew Gardens, Queens. She screamed for help over a half hour while bystanders and apartment-dwellers above apparently ignored her pleas. Her assailant had time to disguise himself during the attack. She died of her injuries, and experts at the time called the failure of bystanders to act “Genovese Syndrome.”

While the online world isn’t nearly as dire as Genovese’s tragedy, its clear from a recent OSU study that bystander syndrome that bears her name is still alive and well. The study watched 221 students as they interacted in a chat room. A bully would appear and berate other members of the group. According to the study, “only 10 percent of the students who noticed the abuse directly intervened, either by confronting the bully online or helping the victim.” Read More


LEGO Crosses The Digital Divide

LEGO Crosses The Digital Divide

Fast Company - David Lumb

With licensing agreements with Hollywood’s biggest franchises, a wildly successful film series of its own, and original product lines that have spawned television and Internet tie-ins, Lego is experiencing a boom that makes its brush with bankruptcy over a decade ago seem like an alternate reality. Plus, it still lacks any real competition in the interlocking-building-toy field. The company does what it does, and it does it really well. That’s why, unlike the rest of the toy industry—or the world, for that matter—Lego isn’t tripping over itself trying to integrate accelerometers or Bluetooth or Internet of things functionality into all of its product lines to get kids’ attention. Read More


Facebook, Oculus And The Future Of Virtual Reality

Facebook, Oculus And The Future Of Virtual Reality

TechCrunch - Dan Kaplan

Imagine a scene:

You’re in your chair at home, the latest Oculus VR headset encircling your head, and you use its voice recognition feature to access Facebook.

Facebook’s virtual reality newsfeed appears in front of you — a three-dimensional, horizontally-scrolling wall of cards. Each card contains a virtual experience, and much like the auto-playing videos in Facebook’s newsfeed today, each of them offers a few moments of the experience on a loop. Read More


Anybody Can Learn With Grit, Persistence and Coding

Anybody Can Learn With Grit, Persistence and Coding

Code.org - Kiki Prottsman

Did you know that Walt Disney went bankrupt in 1923? J.K. Rowling was rejected 12 times before one publisher (grudgingly) agreed to claim Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Play-Doh was originally a wallpaper-cleaning compound.

While these might seem like random examples of people who failed before they made it big. The truth is, people who achieve the greatest things in life are the ones who look at failure not as a sign that they’re worthless, but as a clue about what they can fix to get the result that they want.

Failure is at the core of computer science. Read More


How Do STEM Degrees Pay Off?

How Do STEM Degrees Pay Off?

The Wall Street Journal - Robert Litan

“You earn what you learn,” President Bill Clinton said. That aphorism is true, but the data show that what you learn and firms that value that learning really make the difference when it comes to good wages and wage growth.

That’s the lesson from a recent Brookings Institution report by Jonathan Rothwell and Mark Muro. The researchers looked at wage growth in “advanced industries” vs. the rest of the economy. They defined industries as advanced if at least $450 was spent on research and development per worker (which put them in the 80th percentile of all industries) and if their share of workers with backgrounds in the STEM fields–science, technology, engineering, and math–was higher than the national average. The authors note that 50 industries meet this two-part test, including manufacturing industries such as autos and aerospace, energy industries such as oil and gas extraction, and high-tech services such as computer software and computer system design (counting those for health applications). Read More


Someday, Doctors Could Prescribe Video Games For Your Brain

Someday, Doctors Could Prescribe Video Games For Your Brain

BuzzFeed - Stephanie M. Lee

This video game could actually be a medical therapy. Researchers are testing it in patients with cognitive disorders, like simultaneous autism and ADHD, although skeptics question so-called “brain games” in general.

You’re a bright-yellow alien cruising down a river with icebergs at every sharp turn. Your goal: to leap up and grab the hovering objects of certain colors while ignoring the others. The more objects you grab, the faster they appear before you. Read More


Android Apps Get New Global Age-Rating System On Google Play Store

Android Apps Get New Global Age-Rating System On Google Play Store

The Guardian - Stuart Dredge

Google is introducing a new age-rating system for Android apps and games on its Google Play store, while also revealing a new policy of reviewing apps before they are published on the store.

The new age-rating system will see Android developers completing a questionnaire about their app or game’s content before it is published, rather than simply choosing a rating.

“The developer goes in and takes this single questionnaire, based on the level of content that they have in their app, and at the end of the questionnaire they have the ability to activate ratings for different territories,” Eunice Kim, product manager for Google Play, told the Guardian. Read More


The Impact Of eLearning On K12 Education

The Impact Of eLearning On K12 Education

eLearning Industry - Mukul Agrawal

eLearning And Its Impact On K12 Education

There is an increasing number of collective and concerted environments which are made available to educators and teachers. There is a great potential for supporting online learning and research has found out the effectiveness of such environments. There is seen great strategizing and synthesizing of all information to have procedural knowledge that will be used by educators for professional development activities. There has been made huge effort to provide access to publications on the policies relevant to eLearning. Read More


How The iPad Is Changing The Way We Learn

How The iPad Is Changing The Way We Learn

The Telegraph - Rhiannon Williams

“What’s wrong with education cannot be fixed with technology. No amount of technology will make a dent.” So said Steve Jobs in 1996 - during an interview in which the Apple co-founder claimed the bureaucratic, political and sociopolitical problems facing the education sector were beyond technology’s capacity to fix.

In the 19 years since Jobs uttered those words, the issues weighing heavily on the shoulders of educators, schools, universities and other educational facilities have undoubtedly multiplied. But so too have the ways in which technology can be harnessed to address some of the tensions within teaching and learning. Read More


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