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Code: Debugging the Gender Gap

Code: Debugging the Gender Gap

Re/code - Liz Gannes

The problem of a lack of women in technology runs deep. It can’t be easily fixed. But perhaps one way to step forward is to bundle together statistics, anecdotes, history and role models into a polished feature-length documentary.

That’s the aim of “Code: Debugging the Gender Gap,” debuting today at the Tribeca Film Festival. The film places much of the blame for tech’s lack of female representation on self-fulfilling stereotypes that coders are anti-social dudes (and, more recently, misogynistic brogrammers).

It traces the drop in women computer science grads in the U.S. from 37 percent in 1985 to less than half that today. And it proposes that the start of a solution would be a U.S. computer science high school graduation requirement. Read More


Kindergarteners Who Share iPads May Perform Better

Kindergarteners Who Share iPads May Perform Better

TIME - Alexandra Sifferlin

Students perform better if they share an iPad with another student as opposed to having one all to themselves, according to a new study.

Though schools nationwide have ramped up their efforts to introduce technology in the classroom, there’s just a small body of evidence on the benefits for students. Now a new study suggests that iPads do have a role in academic performance, but the effect may be greater when students collaborate. Read More


How This Sixth-Grade Teacher’s Warning About the Internet Went Viral on Facebook

How This Sixth-Grade Teacher’s Warning About the Internet Went Viral on Facebook

The Reader's Digest - Alyssa Jung

At the end of 2014, Tulsa, Oklahoma, sixth-grade teacher Melissa Bour received a friend request on Facebook from one of her students. She didn’t accept the request, but a quick browse through the girl’s friends list revealed the names of dozens of kids from her classroom. Many of the students’ Facebook pages were completely public, meaning even strangers could trawl through the kids’ personal photos and messages.

“I saw middle fingers, students dressed inappropriately, and extremely foul language,” Melissa says. “It was disturbing.” When she brought up her discovery in class, the students were unfazed. So she created a post of her own. Read More


Rainy Day Ideas for Couples, Families and Kids

Rainy Day Ideas for Couples, Families and Kids

The Dating Divas - Carisa

I am definitely feeling a need for some beautiful, sun-shiny days! I’m anxiously awaiting summer days at the splash pad… However, here are some fun rainy day ideas to help keep the kids, and let’s be honest, me entertained!

I love spring, but it taunts me a little with all the rainy days… one day its beautiful and then all of a sudden, we are stuck inside for a week with the rain! I know I can get a little crazy when I’m cooped up inside. Read More


Lee Kuan Yew, Excellence and Education

Lee Kuan Yew, Excellence and Education

MindMake - Paul Henderson

Taxis in major cities have their own livery. Here it was blue. And the boxlike vehicle I was in was scampering down a glistening highway, leaving the airport behind. Rains had cleared the smog drifting in from Indonesia, cleansing the air, and an otherwise ugly trip into town, typified by overpasses, running walls of patched grey concrete and merging roads suddenly blossomed. For bougainvilleas in their thousands hung flowering along our way. Teeming parapets of green and purple. I was back in Singapore, and glad of it.

Glad because I had come to appreciate countries that valued the ‘rule of law’. Nations where law ruled, favouring no one, no matter whether you were rich, poor, Chinese, Indian or Malay. In Singapore you’ll be treated equally—neither race, rank nor religion curry favour. Read More


Monster Heart Medic: A Fun Adventure Game App to Promote Healthy Living

Fun Educational Apps

How do you diagnose and help a three-eyed monster with a heart problem? That's the challenge and fun in the new, free Monster Heart Medic iPhone/iPad app, now available in the App Store. This educational adventure game uses animated monster stories, interactive simulators, arcade games, virtual diagnostic tests and more to explore the cardiovascular system and how it's affected by healthy living.

Monster Heart Medic introduces kids to a friendly monster named Ragnar who is in need of a helping hand. As kids uncover Ragnar's health problems and guide him towards heart-healthier habits, they learn about common cardiovascular risks like high blood pressure, diagnostic tests for conditions like high cholesterol, and behavioral changes like diet and exercise that can keep a monster—and themselves—healthy. Read More


5 Ways Parents of Preschoolers Can Raise a Body-Positive Kid

5 Ways Parents of Preschoolers Can Raise a Body-Positive Kid

Common Sense Media - Sierra Filucci

How's this for a scary statistic: Studies show that kids as young as 5 say they don’t like their bodies.

Common Sense Media's survey of body-image research -- Children, Teens, Media and Body Image -- reveals many more surprising facts, but it also shows evidence that parents play a huge role in shaping how kids think and feel about their bodies. Starting to bolster kids' body image early, even in preschool, can make a big difference in how kids feel about themselves as they grow up.

Here are five ways to immunize your kids against poor body image, with conversation starters, media picks, and resources to support your discussions. Read More


Tyranny Of The Chicken Finger: A Generation of Unsophisticated, Picky Eaters

Tyranny Of The Chicken Finger: A Generation of Unsophisticated, Picky Eaters

National Post - Adam McDowell

Cut up a fresh, bone-in chicken breast and you’ll notice that it naturally separates into two distinct parts: a larger, teardrop-shaped lobe of flesh — the piece of meat that you probably think of when someone says “chicken breast” — and a more narrow piece sometimes referred to as a “tender.” The chicken finger originated in the need to find something to do with that tender, explains food historian Gary Allen in a short history of the convenience food published online five years ago.

Chicken fingers, Allen says, were seldom seen before 1990 or so, but by the end of the 1980s, fear of saturated fats turned many North Americans away from beef and toward chicken. Increased demand meant billions of additional chicken breasts were processed — but what was the industry to do with the tenders? The answer is on children’s plates. Read More


How Is Facebook, Instagram, And Twitter Taking Over Lives?

How Is Facebook, Instagram, And Twitter Taking Over Lives?

Business Insider UK - Caroline Moss

Are you addicted to Facebook and Instagram? How about Twitter?

Four women told the Herald Sun that they are absolutely addicted to the social media platforms...and what it's meant for their lives, careers, and relationships with loved ones.

One woman, 40-year-old Natalie Trice, says she's on Facebook and Twitter for five hours a day, but feels absolutely no guilt. Read More


6 Ways Teachers Respond To Education Technology

6 Ways Teachers Respond To Education Technology

TeachThought

The Backstory of the Pencil Metaphor

If you’re looking for the 6 ways part–well, hold your horses; first, a little backstory.

The pencil metaphor for edtech integration isn’t new. In fact, two years ago, someone else wrote a blog post saying the same thing. Apparently, there is an old Australian education site that first hosted it, but it’s no more. We first saw the image about four months ago, and have been intrigued the way it continues to resurface every dozen weeks or so like a kind of zombie graphic. Read More


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